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      Remembering World War I
      Media

      Political leaders

      Four imperial dynasties—the Habsburgs of Austria-Hungary, the Hohenzollerns of Germany, the sultanate of the Ottoman Empire, and the Romanovs of Russia—would collapse as a direct result of the war, and peace was merely a prelude to revolution in numerous countries.

      Poetry

      It is hard to overstate the enduring effect of World War I on the arts, given the cultural blossoming of the Weimar Renaissance and the emergence of the Lost Generation of writers in the 1920s, to cite two notable examples. The mood during the war, however, is perhaps best captured by the poetry of the period, which reveals a progression of popular sentiment from patriotic idealism to anger to despair and disillusionment. Some of these works are made especially poignant by the fact that their authors did not survive the conflict that they chronicled.

      Thomas Hardy: “Men Who March Away”

      Thomas Hardy was an established English novelist and poet when war broke out. At age 74, he was also a half-century older than many of the men who would fight and die on the Western Front. This poem, written in the style of a marching song, captures the enthusiasm of the early weeks of the war, when quick victory seemed assured. It was first published in The Times on September 9, 1914.

      What of the faith and fire within us
      Men who march away
      Ere the barn-cocks say
      Night is growing gray,
      Leaving all that here can win us;
      What of the faith and fire within us
      Men who march away?


      Is it a purblind prank, O think you,
      Friend with the musing eye,
      Who watch us stepping by
      With doubt and dolorous sigh?
      Can much pondering so hoodwink you!
      Is it a purblind prank, O think you,
      Friend with the musing eye?


      Nay. We well see what we are doing,
      Though some may not see—
      Dalliers as they be—
      England’s need are we;
      Her distress would leave us rueing:
      Nay. We well see what we are doing,
      Though some may not see!


      In our heart of hearts believing
      Victory crowns the just,
      And that braggarts must
      Surely bite the dust,
      Press we to the field ungrieving,
      In our heart of hearts believing
      Victory crowns the just.


      Hence the faith and fire within us
      Men who march away
      Ere the barn-cocks say
      Night is growing gray,
      Leaving all that here can win us;
      Hence the faith and fire within us
      Men who march away.


      Rupert Brooke: “The Soldier

      A wellborn English poet gifted with charm, good looks, and a circle of friends that included Virginia Woolf, Rupert Brooke would become a symbol of young promise snuffed out by the war. His poems were boldly optimistic, expressing a confidence that sacrifices, if they must be made, would be for the greater good. “The Soldier,” his best-known work, was published in 1915 in the collection 1914. Brooke died of septicemia on a hospital ship off the coast of the Greek island of Skyros on April 23, 1915.

      If I should die, think only this of me:
      That there’s some corner of a foreign field
      That is for ever England. There shall be
      In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
      A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
      Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
      A body of England’s, breathing English air,
      Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.


      And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
      A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
      Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
      Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
      And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
      In hearts at peace, under an English heaven.


      John McCrae: “In Flanders Fields

      Lieut. Col. John McCrae was unusual among the “trench poets” in that he was a senior officer with prior combat experience. Having previously served in the South African (Boer) War, the Canadian physician enlisted in the Canadian Contingent of the BEF upon the outbreak of World War I. He served as a medical officer at the Second Battle of Ypres, an experience that inspired him to pen “In Flanders Fields.” The poem was first published in the December 8, 1915, issue of the British magazine Punch. McCrae died of pneumonia on January 28, 1918, while supervising a Canadian field hospital near Boulogne, France.

      In Flanders fields the poppies blow
      Between the crosses, row on row,
      That mark our place; and in the sky,
      The larks, still bravely singing, fly,
      Scarce heard amid the guns below.


      We are the Dead. Short days ago
      We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
      Loved and were loved, and now we lie
      In Flanders fields.


      Take up our quarrel with the foe:
      To you from failing hands we throw
      The torch; be yours to hold it high.
      If ye break faith with us who die
      We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
      In Flanders fields.


      Wilfred Owen: “Dulce et decorum est”

      By late 1917 the enthusiasm and sense of noble sacrifice that typified earlier trench poems had given way to fatalism, anger, and despair. Wilfred Owen was an experienced, if unpublished, English poet when the war began, but his personal style underwent a transformation in 1917. Diagnosed with shell shock (combat fatigue), Owen was sent to recuperate in a hospital near Edinburgh, where he met Siegfried Sassoon, a pacifist poet of some renown. The two shared their views about the futility of war, and Owen went on to produce a poem that captured the essence of trench warfare in a shockingly descriptive manner. The poem’s title is taken from Horace’s Odes: “Dulce et decorum est, pro patria mori” (“It is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country”). After his hospital stay, Owen returned to the front lines. He was awarded the Military Cross for bravery in October 1918. He was killed in action on November 4, 1918, just a week before the signing of the armistice that ended the war.

      Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
      Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
      Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
      And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
      Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
      But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
      Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
      Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.


      Gas! Gas! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling,
      Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
      But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
      And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime…
      Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light
      As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.


      In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
      He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.


      If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
      Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
      And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
      His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;
      If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
      Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
      Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
      Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—
      My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
      To children ardent for some desperate glory,
      The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
      Pro patria mori.


      Remembering World War I
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